3D stereoscopic game with gesture controls for 3D LG CINEMA TVs

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Posted on 01/14/2013



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Russian company United 3D Labs developed a 3D stereoscopic interactive game as part of a promo event for 3D LG CINEMA TVs.

The user controls the game via gestures, utilizing a Kinect sensor. The game was made using a 3D stereo format and demonstrates all the LG CINEMA 3D TVs advantages in an interesting and highly interactive way. It was also a good showcase of how emerging technologies, motion controls and 3D viewing in this case, can combine to create even better entertainment tools.

The promo, which was held at one of Moscow’s biggest cinemas, was a huge hit with customers and is another great example of how you can use the Kinect to make advertising campaigns more attention-grabbing and engaging for consumers.

Learn more about the developer and their projects using the link below.

 

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A Kinect-powered interactive picture frame

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Posted on 01/11/2013



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We’ve seen how the Kinect can be used by different people to create various iterations of art but what about a Kinect hack that lets you display art? Check out this interactive picture frame:

  • The xyz-position of the viewers head in the room is connected to the position of the virtual camera.
  • Pacing back and forth from one wall to the other will change the image.
  • The app uses maxmsp with a kinect sensor.

It looks like something galleries can use to spruce up their displays or maximize their limited space. What do you think?

To learn more about the project and the developer, be sure to visit the project website using the link below.

 

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Have a spooky experience with Ghosthunter

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Posted on 01/09/2013



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Halloween may be a couple of months away but we thought we’d share something that could make your next Kinect gaming session a scary but fun experience — Ghosthunter!

In Ghosthunter, the player explores a haunted house to find and capture wandering spirits. To aid them in this quest, players have a ghost detector and capture unit, which they use to scan the room for poltergeists. As they scan, the ghost detector, which in this case is your Xbox 360 controller, vibrates when a ghost is near. Here are a little more details from the developers:

“The player moves the Xbox 360 controller around in the Kinect-visible space to act out the process of scanning the room, bringing them closer into the action. When a ghost pops out, players are so engaged that they literally jump in surprise!”

Ghosthunter, which won the UCSC Sammy Awards 2012 Practicum Prize, looks like a fun little title that brings us back to the Kinect’s gaming roots. Check it out and let us know what you think!

Skulls — A face tracking app from Paradox D&D

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Posted on 01/07/2013



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As the Kinect continues to gain popularity with hackers everywhere, Microsoft has been adding new features for people to tinker with. Paradox D&D wanted to take the opportunity to try the new features that Kinect provides and ended up with an app that’s capabale of face-tracking:

“We developed ‘Skulls,’  an application with Face Tracking which positions a 3D skull and replaces the user’s head. In addition to Face Tracking, has also been used the video capture image to provide a ‘natural augmented reality,’ using the user’s own body for referencing 3D models.

“The Skulls application provides 3 types of heads options: skull bone, skull radiography and skull in flames (based on Ghost Rider’s comic). Furthermore, a controller is added to the user’s mouth so that it can open and close the skull’s jaw. This application is an example of a new technology that offers many possibilities and is in the line of ‘virtual dressers’ (in which the user ‘wears’ 3D elements: dresses, costumes, accessories, etc.).”

Unfortunately, for those hoping to replicate Paradox D&D’s app, it is not open source. But it is a good demonstration of what you can do with the Kinect with a little time and elbow grease.

To learn more about Skulls and other Paradox D&D projects, be sure to visit the link below.

 

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Chris Vik and Brad Hammond collaborate to create Ethno Tekh

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Posted on 01/04/2013



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The Kinect has been breaking ground in music and audio visual performance. It’s opened doors for visionaries everywhere to showcase new kinds of performance arts that utilize music, motion and machines. Today’s featured hack is another example of this.

Ethno Tekh is a collaboration between Chris Vik, the man behind Kinectar, and Splash’s Brad Hammond. Together, their latest project creates interactive installations and motion capture-based audio visual performances. Ethno Tekh is their very first Kinect-based audio visual performance that was presented at Microsoft’s TechEd 2012.

Here’s a rundown of the technical details from the developers:

“Our system is built primarily with Max and Unity3D, with the music and visuals run off separate computers. There’s a lot of communication between the two systems using OSC, including trigger messaging for instrument changes and drops, as well as FFT audio analysis and MIDI to OSC conversions to closely tie the vision with the audio.”

For more details on Ethno Tekh, be sure to visit the project website. We’ve included a link for you below.

 

Visit Project Website